Water Protectors seeing cases dismissed, Indigenous view on the outdoor recreation industry, and more

In this post:

  • Line 3 water protectors seeing case dismissed
  • Native Governance Center online event: Sovereignty and Outdoor Spaces
  • Amnesty International on the U.S.’s ongoing failure to protect Indigenous women from sexual violence
  • Reflections from a white Evangelical on Native American genocide, the white supremacist terrorist in Buffalo, NY, and Replacement Theory
  • Lakota People’s Law Project: Mining is destroying the Black Hills (includes action request)
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Understanding the Regulatory/Industrial Complex’s ‘Pipeline Playbook’

File: Line 3 construction

The Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), Enbridge Line 3 in Minnesota, Enbridge Line 5 in Wisconsin and Michigan, and other crude oil pipelines have had, or continue to have, controversial paths towards approval.

With the exception of Keystone XL, corporate interests have won out over strong public resistance and weak regulatory oversight. 

Pipeline firms have got the go-ahead on massive infrastructure projects in spite of their their treaty violations, their troubling track records, and their long-term environmental costs, including their significant climate damage.

The Regulatory/Industrial Complex has a Pipeline Playbook that needs to be named and called out.

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News and Events: Pope Francis apologizes to Canadian First Nations; Washington State launches MMIW alert and more

In this post:

  • Pope Francis apologizes to Canadian First Nations for residential schools
  • Washington States launches first-in-the-country statewide MMIR alerts
  • Webinar: Building Relations with the Plant Nation
  • Boarding School survivors tell their stories in new Healing Voices Video Project
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MN Office of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives has first director, and other news

In this post:

  • MN Office of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives has first director
  • Tribes can prosecute non-tribal members for sexual violence on reservation land under new federal law
  • Plans for Wakan Tipi Center moving forward
  • CUAPB: Minneapolis eviction of homeless encampment mirrors no-knock warrant
  • Rapid City hotel owner wants to bar Native Americans after shooting
  • Virginia: Monacan Indian Nation wins pipeline battle
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Online movie screenings: MMIW and manoomin

Free online movies this week:

  • Bring Her Home, on the epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, profiling three women.
  • Food that grows on Water, a short documentary on how the Enbridge Line 3 tar sands pipelines will affect wild rice.

Unfortunately, they’re both on the same day and overlap a bit, so you might have to choose one. Or, make it a double feature!

Please share with your networks.

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Landowner forces closed a camp for unhoused Indigenous women; it has nowhere to go

Camp Nenoocaasi for unhoused Indigenous women was forced to close.

Three days before “Thanksgiving,” a squatters camp of unhoused Indigenous women in South Minneapolis is closing following the property owner’s demand to leave.

Camp Nenoocaasi (Ojibwe for hummingbird) had provided a safe space for Indigenous women since Sept. 19. It was located on the site of an abandoned Speedway gas station at East 25th Street and Bloomington Avenue South. It was serving 30-35 women.

The camp got notice last week it needed to leave on Monday, said Erica Whitaker, one of the camp’s volunteers.

Rather than be forcibly removed, volunteers began packing up tents and other supplies this morning.

“We don’t have anywhere to go right now,” Whitaker said. “I acknowledge and understand property rights. But these women, this is their land to begin with.”

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Reflections on violence and justice along the Enbridge Line 3 route

Honor the Earth got pushback on its planned Aug. 18 music festival in Duluth, a fundraiser to oppose Enbridge Line 3 tar sands pipeline.

A group of 11 northern Minnesota mayors and councilmembers wrote Duluth Mayor Emily Larson telling her to pull the event’s permit, claiming Honor the Earth has been involved in “violent” protests against the pipelines. “Honor the Earth has played a significant role in creating the dangerous and harmful environment surrounding the Line 3 pipeline replacement project.”

Winona LaDuke, co-founder of Honor the Earth, called the elected officials’ claims “scandalous” and “wrong.” “We haven’t led any violent protests,” LaDuke said. “We have been entirely non-violent and educational.”

“We spent eight years trying to make the system work in the legal and regulatory hearings and are now encouraging people to express their First Amendment rights.”

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