Line 3: Don’t be distracted from the true danger

Screen grab of Unicorn Riot’s feed showing part of Friday’s protest.

Friday’s bomb scare in Carlton County will be used by some to make water protectors seem dangerous, shifting attention away from real dangers posed by the Enbridge Line 3 tar sands pipeline.

Water protectors were demonstrating against Line 3 in Carlton County Friday. As the event was happening, the county received a 9-1-1 call reporting a “suspicious device,” the Sheriff’s Office said. A news story called it “a suspicious package thrown into a pipeline construction area.”

The county’s response was quick and perhaps excessive. It called in the bomb squad. Law enforcement evacuated 40 nearby residences within a half-mile radius of the device. Carlton County Sheriff Kelly Lake called in regional and federal law enforcement. She’s calling for maximum charges and penalties.

There was no bomb. Still, placing a “replica device” that causes fear and panic is a crime.

The incident occurred near Camp Migizi, an Indigenous-led frontline resistance camp, but the protests that day were several miles away from where the incident occurred.

There’s been no information released that ties the incident to Camp Migizi or the protest. There have been no arrests. Yet without evidence, Enbridge and others are blaming water protectors.

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‘Healing in these traumatic times’ essay, ‘This is Dakota Land’ yard signs, and more

In this blog:

  • ‘Healing for these traumatic times’ essay
  • “This is Dakota land” lawn signs available
  • Line 3 update: Beltrami County Sheriff seeks reimbursement for weapons under the guise of personal protective equipment
  • DAPL decision delayed
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As the end of the internal combustion engine comes into focus, ongoing pressure to stop Line 3 and DAPL

In this blog:

  • Car caravan to Stop Line 3 Friday, Feb. 5 in Hill City
  • Decision day for DAPL next Wednesday
  • Reason #476 to reject Line 3 and DAPL: Gas is becoming worthless
  • Hiding behind the “trade secret” label
  • LaDuke’s annual missive of mockery to Monaco: ‘Do you miss me? It’s hard not to miss you.’
  • Line 3 Hot Potato: The Video
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Looking for the trifecta: Stopping DAPL, Keystone XL, and Enbridge Line 3

In this blog:

  • Another court win! Pressure now on Biden to shut down DAPL
  • Video celebrating the movement that stopped Keystone XL
  • Ways President Biden could Stop Line 3
  • Update on legal motions to stay Line 3’s construction
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Enbridge Line 3 tree and shrub clearing well underway, law enforcement hypocrisy, and other news

In this blog:

  • Enbridge Line 3 tree and vegetation clearing well underway
  • Use of force: Capitol vs. Standing Rock (Indian Country Today)
  • Biden could swing these 5 pipeline battles (E&E News)
  • 96-year-old Navajo woman becomes an internet hit (Indian Country Today)
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How will Minnesota law enforcement respond to Line 3 protests?

Hint: It’s a secret

Almost two years ago, Unicorn Riot published an investigative piece on how the state of Minnesota was preparing to respond to expected protests over construction of the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline. (Multi-Agency Task Force Prepares “Rules of Engagement” For Line 3 Protests.)

It pulled the curtain back on the “Northern Lights Task Force,” a group that was “stockpiling equipment and training police in preparation for Line 3 pipeline protests across the state.”

The coordination involved law enforcement agencies from states across the region including Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Documents showed that state officials had created an incident ‘Mobile Response Teams’ (or ‘MRTs’) to rapidly deploy and “confront any protest against the pipeline” in each of the State Patrol districts.

More than four months ago, when it began to look like the state would approved Line 3, Healing Minnesota Stories wrote the Minnesota Department of Public Safety to ask for basic information on the Northern Lights Task Force.

So far, the department hasn’t provided any information.

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Sign DAPL, Keystone XL eviction notices; Chocktaw chief will help redesign Mississippi state flag, and more

In this blog:

  • Sign eviction notice for Dakota Access, Keystone XL pipelines
  • Lakota People’s Law Project: Return Mount Rushmore
  • Choctaw chief chosen to help redesign Mississippi state flag
  • Cherokee Nation adopted racism from Europeans. It’s time to reject it.

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Regulators need to increase trespass fines against pipeline companies, and other pipeline news

With oil pipeline companies brazenly flaunting trespass laws, you have to wonder whether the penalties are just too low. Perhaps it’s cheaper for them to break the law and pay the fines than the cost of taking the time to follow the law.

Recent trespass cases involving the Tesoro High Plains Pipeline in North Dakota and the Bayou Bridge Pipeline in Louisiana raise the question of whether pipeline penalties are too lax.

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Big oil arrogance: DAPL refuses to shut down in spite of judge’s order, then backs off, and other news

As pipeline resisters were celebrating a U.S. District Court ruling requiring the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) to shut down pending environmental reviews, DAPL’s operator seemed to thumb its nose at the ruling, suggesting it would refuse to comply.

Shortly after Energy Transfer LP’s corporate chest thumping, the company seemed to back off the threat, but it clearly seemed to want to send a message.

On other pipeline fronts, the Keystone XL pipeline faces a major setback, the Trans Mountain Pipeline loses an insurance provider, and in spite of a favorable U.S. Supreme Court ruling, the natural gas Atlantic Coast Pipeline still will be scrapped. Continue reading

Standing Rock, Indian Country, score big court victory against DAPL

From protest for sending Hennepin County Sheriff’s deputies to Standing Rock.

The Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) has to shut down by Aug. 5 and the pipeline emptied of oil until the project’s environmental impact statement is finished and treaty rights and other environmental challenges are resolved, according to a court ruling today. According to the ruling by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia:

Fearing severe environmental consequences, American Indian Tribes on nearby reservations have sought for several years to invalidate federal permits allowing the Dakota Access Pipeline to carry oil under the lake [Lake Oahe]. Today they finally achieve that goal — at least for the time being.

Depending on the results of a pending environmental impact statement, DAPL could be forced to shut down permanently.

Energy Transfer, a leading partner in DAPL, criticized the ruling and vowed to challenge it. The company faces problems on second front, as oil firms are trying to back out of commitments they made to ship oil on a proposed DAPL expansion.

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