As Key Enbridge Line 3 Vote Looms Monday, Encouraging News in Other Pipeline Resistance Efforts

Proposals to build new crude oil pipelines are an investment in an old and failing energy infrastructure. They reflect a world view that favors short-term profits over the long-term health of local economies and the planet itself. Investors make money off selling refined gas, but shift long-term costs to future generations — costs from destructive oil mining practices, costs from future oil spills, and costs from climate change.

It is no wonder that Native nations and indigenous advocates have lead efforts to stop new crude oil pipelines, as they hold to a world view that considers the impacts of decisions seven generations into the future.

As we head into what is expected to be a frustrating Monday meeting at the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) regarding the future of Enbridge Line 3, let’s pause for a moment to reflect on some recent wins. They are a reminder that this work takes years, allies continue the resistance, and we do have victories. Continue reading

Lecture: Future of Indian Law Under a Trump Administration

Suzan Harjo
Suzan Harjo (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee), a poet, writer, and leading Native American rights advocate, will be speaking tonight on the future of Indian law under a Trump administration at Mitchell Hamline Law School, 875 Summit Ave, St Paul. The talk will be held in Room 323 starting at 6:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public. Here is the announcement.

According to an online bio of Harjo posted by the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, she is the former executive director of the National Congress of American Indians and has advocated for decades for laws to promote Native nations’ sovereignty, languages and religious freedom, as well as pass the National Museum of the American Indian Act. Harjo is one of seven Native people “who filed the 1992 landmark case Harjo et al v. Pro Football, Inc., against the disparaging name of the Washington football team.”

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Sovereignty Matters: Perspectives on the Dakota Access Pipeline Project

thunderbirdwomanA free panel discussion to learn diverse Native perspectives on the Dakota Access Pipeline will be held Monday, October 31, 3 p.m. in the Crosby Seminar Room, 240 Northrop at the University of Minnesota. It is being hosted by the Institute for Advanced Study.

The event is titled: Sovereignty Matters: Perspectives on the Dakota Access Pipeline Project. According to the on-line announcement:

This panel will present the various perspectives at stake in the DAPL case, from historical, legal, environmental, cultural, and personal viewpoints. How does this case speak to the state of American Indian sovereignty today? Does Federal ambivalence indicate an admission that Native/state relations require attention? What is at stake for Standing Rock and all Native nations?

The panelists will be: Continue reading