The Covenant Church is the first evangelical church to repudiate the Doctrine of Discovery

The Evangelical Covenant Church’s Christian Action Committee, the church’s annual conference, met Friday in Minneapolis and passed a resolution repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery.

The Covenant Church joins several Protestant denominations in taking this important step, but is the first evangelical church to do so. The resolution passed with 84 percent of the vote, according to one of the participants.

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This Day in History: U.S. Supreme Court Adopts ‘Doctrine of Discovery

On this day in history, Feb. 28, 1823, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in Johnson v. M’Intosh which adopted a secular form of 15th Century Papal decrees into U.S. case law. The decision said when explorers representing European monarchs “discovered” this land, it was the same as them taking title to the land.

Here is a verbatim from the decision, issued by Chief Justice Marshall:

On the discovery of this immense continent, the great nations of Europe were eager to appropriate to themselves so much of it as they could respectively acquire. Its vast extent offered an ample field to the ambition and enterprise of all; and the character and religion of its inhabitants [Native Americans] afforded an apology for considering them as a people over whom the superior genius of Europe might claim an ascendency. The potentates of the old world found no difficulty in convincing themselves that they made ample compensation to the inhabitants of the new, by bestowing on them civilization and Christianity, in exchange for unlimited independence.But, as they [European monarchs] were all in pursuit of nearly the same object, it was necessary, in order to avoid conflicting settlements, and consequent war with each other, to establish a principle which all should acknowledge as the law by which the right of acquisition, which they all asserted, should be regulated as between themselves. This principle was that discovery gave title to the government by whose subjects, or by whose authority, it was made, against all other European governments, which title might be consummated by possession. [Emphasis added.]

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