Holocaust survivors continue to receive German reparations payments to this day

Part of an ongoing series exploring reparations

By Vic Rosenthal and Scott Russell

Jewish men in the Radom ghetto March, 1941. They were forced to wear white armbands with a blue Star of David to mark them as outsiders. Photo: Brenner/Wikimedia Commons

Sarah (not her real name) was a teenager in Radom, Poland when Germany invaded her country in September, 1939, the start of World War II.

Now a U.S. citizen in her 90s, she remembers living in extreme poverty and constant hunger in the Radom ghetto. Many men were taken away and never seen again. Sarah was forced into slave labor, her brother taken away. She and her mother were sent on a death march to Auschwitz and later Bergen Belsen.

“More than five years in ghettos with poverty and starvation and two death marches, but I survived,” she said. “I don’t know how.”

Continue reading