Minneapolis seeks public comments on police contract negotiations, appointment of city’s first Community Safety Commissioner

In this post:

  • City of Minneapolis holds community listening sessions on police union contract negotiations
  • Minneapolis City Council to hold public hearing Tuesday on Cedric Alexander’s nomination as the city’s first Community Safety Commissioner
  • Unity Church hosts concert to support Indigenous rights and stop the Huber Lumber Mill Project

City of Minneapolis holds community listening sessions on police union contract negotiations

Minneapolis police fire tear gas at those protesting George Floyd’s murder.

The city of Minneapolis is negotiating a new three-year contract with the Police Federation of Minneapolis and city leaders are seeking public comment. This process will help inform the City’s negotiations, a city release said.

In advance of negotiations, Mayor Jacob Frey convened a working group to develop shared priorities around the contract. Working group members are: Council President Andrea Jenkins (Ward 8), council members LaTrisha Vetaw (Ward 4), Lisa Goodman (Ward 7), and Aisha Chughtai (Ward 10), and city staff.

Note: Council member Jeremiah Ellison (Ward 5) and Jason Chavez (Ward 9) represent neighborhoods that are disproportionately BIPOC and low income but weren’t at the table. Ellison’s ward includes the Near North and Jordan neighborhoods. Chavez’s ward includes Powderhorn Park, East Phillips and Midtown Phillips, and most of the Central neighborhood. Those seem like important voices to include.

Frey’s working group is hosting these listening sessions:

The City will explain the negotiation process and hold work group meetings “where people can collaborate on ideas related to the contract,” a city email said.

Find more information about the negotiations on the City’s website.

The new contract will cover Jan. 1, 2023 to Dec. 31, 2025.

It was just March 28 when the City Council voted 8-5 to approve the police union contract covering Jan. 1, 2020 to Dec. 31, 2022. Voting no were council members Elliott Payne (Ward 1), Robin Wonsley (Ward 2), Ellison, Chavez, and Aisha Chughtai (Ward 10).

Shaping the upcoming contract negotiations will be the Minnesota Department of Human Rights’ scathing report on the Minneapolis Police Department’s (MPD’s) pattern of discriminatory policing, released earlier this year.

Minneapolis City Council to hold public hearing Tuesday on Cedric Alexander’s nomination as the city’s first community safety commissioner

The City Council’s Committee of the Whole will hold a public hearing Tuesday to consider Mayor Frey’s nomination of Cedric Alexander for the City’s first community safety commissioner.

This new role will oversee the mayor’s newly proposed Office of Community Safety, which will integrate five departments: 911, Fire, the Office of Emergency Management, Police, and Neighborhood Safety (currently the Office of Violence Prevention).

The hearing will start at 1:30 p.m., Room 317, City Hall, 350 S. Fifth St.

People can attend in person or pre-register online to participate. (On-line registration ends three hours before the hearing.) Letters may also be submitted for the public record by email to cityclerk@minneapolismn.gov or mailed to Office of City Clerk/Attn: Appointments, City Hall, Room 304. 350 S. Fifth St. Minneapolis, MN 55415.

Alexander has previously served as the director of public safety for DeKalb County in Georgia where he oversaw police, fire, emergency response and 911. He also served as the chief of police and later deputy mayor for the City of Rochester, New York, president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, and a member of President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing.

Learn more about participating in a public hearing.

Frey opposed last fall’s City Charter amendment that would have replaced the MPD with a new Department of Public Safety. The new agency would have taken a public health approach to public safety. The amendment eliminated MPD as a mandatory agency in the City Charter, and would have included licensed police officers in the new Department of Public Safety, if necessary.

Unity Church hosts concert to support Indigenous rights and stop the Huber Lumber Mill Project

Join an evening of music, conversation, and action featuring Annie Humphrey, musician, activist, and member of the Leech Lake Nation. On the heels of the Line 3 pipeline fight comes another threat to tribal rights, forests, and waters in north central Minnesota—a massive lumber mill and forest clearing project.

Come and listen to the concert and learn about the Huber Lumber Mill Project. The event will be held in Unity’s sanctuary (733 Portland Avenue, St. Paul) starting at 7 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. A reception with Annie Humphrey and Honor the Earth representatives Gina Peltier and Daniel Lakemacher will follow, with food from the Sioux Chief / Owamni.

Unity Church-Unitarian is sponsoring this event, in partnership with Honor the Earth to support the fight to stop the Huber Lumber Mill Project until tribal communities are fully consulted and an environmental impact statement is completed.

The event is free, but donations are encouraged to support Annie and Honor the Earth.

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