Upcoming Events: Urban Indian Advocacy Day at the Capitol, film screenings, MMIW fundraiser and more

In this blog:

  • “We Are Still Here” Advocacy Day, Thursday, March 12, 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Film screening and Q&A on The Condor and the Eagle, Thursday, March 19, 7-10 p.m., Riverview Theater
  • INDIgenesis: Gen 3, Opening Night, Thursday, March 19, 7:30 p.m., Walker Art Center (free)
  • No More Stolen Relatives: A Fundraiser for Gitchigumi Scouts, a frontline search group for MMIWR, Friday, March 20, 6-9 p.m. at Walker Church
  • Augsburg Native American Film Series: Protecting Indigenous and Sacred Land through Media: Bears Ears and Other Current Struggles, April 1, 6:15 – 9 p.m. (free)

“We Are Still Here” Advocacy Day, Thursday, March 12, 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Lower Phalen Creek Project is organizing an advocacy day at the Capitol. “This event is for everyone whether it is your first time at the State Legislature or 100th, please come to advocate for the Urban American Indian community and learn about the legislative process,” the announcement said. Here’s the link and the schedule:

7:00 am: Registration and coffee at Minnesota History Center 385 Kellogg Boulevard, Saint Paul.
7:30 am: Training and program
8:30 am: Depart on foot for the Minnesota Capitol
9:00 am- 1:00 pm: Small group meetings with legislators

Lower Phalen Creek Project is an east side Saint Paul organization whose mission is to engage people in honoring and caring for our natural places and the sacred sites and cultural value within them,” its website says. “As our work shifts towards building Wakan Tipi Center, the organization is sharpening its focus to truly engage and honor the uniquely Dakota space in which we work.”

Film screening and Q&A on The Condor and the Eagle, Thursday, March 19, 7-10 p.m., Riverview Theater

Mde Maka Ska Community Conversations and five other groups are sponsoring a screening of The Condor and the Eagle on Thursday, March 19, 7-10 p.m. at the Riverview Theater, 3800 42nd Ave. S., Minneapolis. Tickets are $12. Here’s the film’s synopsis:

Indigenous environmental leaders embark on an extraordinary trans-continental adventure from the Canadian plains to deep into the heart of the Amazonian jungle to unite the peoples of North and South America and deepen the meaning of “Climate Justice.”

The Condor & The Eagle documentary offers a glimpse into a developing spiritual renaissance as the film’s protagonists learn from each other’s long legacy of resistance to colonialism and its extractive economy. Their paths take them on an unexpectedly challenging and liberating journey, which will forever change their attachment to the Earth and one another.

This is a pre-event to the planned launch of the Impact Campaign called “No More Sacrificed Communities.” It’s a six month campaign in North America focusing on lands and waters that are already being sacrificed to the fossil fuel industry and calling for no more sacrificed lands and waters, and for divestment from fossil fuel.

Thursday evening’s event will feature Impact Producer Clement Guerra and the LaPointe family who will facilitate the Q & A. There will be tabling in honor of the sacredness of water, and information on the upcoming World Water Day (March 22). Other co-sponsors are Unitarian Universalist Ministry for Earth, MN350: Building a Climate Movement in Minnesota, Mni Ki Wakan, Minnesota Interfaith Power & Light, and First Universalist Church of Minneapolis.

INDIgenesis: Gen 3, Opening Night, Thursday, March 19, 7:30 p.m., Walker Art Center (free)

The Walker Art Center, 725 Vineland Place, Minneapolis, is presenting the two-week series INDIgenesis: GEN 3, guest curated by Missy Whiteman (Northern Arapaho and Kickapoo Nations).

Opening night, Thursday, March 12, is called Remembering the Future. It’s free to the public. Here’s the Walker’s description:

Combining film, a live score, hoop dancing, hip-hop, and spoken word, a collective of Indigenous artists led by curator Missy Whiteman creates an immersive environment that transcends time and place. Guided by ancestral knowledge systems, traditional stories, and contemporary forms of expression, the expanded cinema program features performances by DJ AO (Hopi/Mdewakatonwan Dakota), Sacramento Knoxx (Ojibwe/Chicano), Lumhe “Micco” Sampson (Mvskoke Creek/Seneca), and Michael Wilson (Ojibwe). Archival footage and Whiteman’s sci-fi docu-narrative The Coyote Way: Going Back Home (2016), filmed in the community of Little Earth in South Minneapolis, illuminate the space.

No More Stolen Relatives: A Fundraiser for Gitchigumi Scouts – a frontline search group for MMIWR, Friday, March 20, 6-9 p.m. at Walker Church

A spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Gitchigumi Scouts will be held Friday, March 20, from 6-9 p.m. at Walker Church, 3104 16th Ave., S., Minneapolis. Suggested donation is $10-25. Those with access to wealth are encouraged to give more. No one will be turned away for lack of fund.

According to the announcement:

The Gitchigumi Scouts is a small group Indigenous people organized around searching for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Relatives in the Twin Ports/Fond Du Lac Reservation area.

They help families find their missing relatives by any means necessary, including but not limited to organizing foot searches and handing out flyers.

In addition they help take care of their community by distributing warm clothes and harm reduction kits with naloxone and clean needles for people struggling with houselessness and addictions. They’ve held anti-sex trafficking community patrols, deconstructing toxic masculinity men’s circles, trauma and healing workshops for indigenous people, and raised awareness on the intersectionality of resource extraction and missing and murdered indigenous women and relatives.

The event is cosponsored by: MN350: Building a Climate Movement in Minnesota, Science for the People – Twin Cities, Ecosocialism Branch – Twin Cities Democratic Socialists of America, and MN350 Action: Climate Justice in Minnesota.

Augsburg Native American Film Series: Protecting Indigenous and Sacred Land through Media: Bears Ears and Other Current Struggles, Wednesday, April 1, 6:15 – 9 p.m. (free)

The next installment of Augsburg University’s Native American Film Series is Protecting Indigenous and Sacred Land through Media: Bears Ears and Other Current Struggles, Wednesday, April 1, 6:15 – 9 p.m. at the Sateren Auditorium, Music Hall, 715 22nd Ave South. Reception from 6:15-6:45 p.m. and the screening begins at 7 p.m. A discussion with participants follows. This event is free to the public.

Here’s Augsburg’s description:

Shásh Jaa’ (Bears Ears) encompasses 1.9 million acres of southeastern Utah wilderness and is considered sacred lands to local Native American tribes. The Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition is an effort of 5 different tribal nations (Navajo, Ute, Ute Mountain Ute, Hopi, Zuni) coming together to protect this pristine ecological area from natural resource extraction development and environmental destruction. This documentary follows Angelo Baca and his grandmother, the director, and the developing Coalition’s efforts on the way to convince the Obama administration to make this area a designated National Monument with a collaborative management plan working in partnership with these tribes.

Join Angelo Baca (Navajo and Hopi) in his screening of Shásh Jaa’ (Bears Ears) and a discussion of current Indigenous land struggles concerning land, water, and natural resources.

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