Events: MN Supreme Court Justice Anne McKeig Speaks on MMIW, Short Films by Indigenous Filmmakers, and More

Upcoming Events:

  • Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Anne K. McKeig speaks on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, April 5
  • Ikidowin Native Youth Ensemble performs: “We Do it for the Water” April 7
  • Documentary: DAWNLAND, cultural survival and stolen children, April 8 and 13
  • Celebrating Native Voices: Short Films by Indigenous Filmmakers, April 16

Details follow.

Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Anne McKeig Speaks on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Anne McKeig

Friday, April 5, First Universalist Church, 3400 Dupont Ave. S., Minneapolis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., event starts at 7 p.m. Facebook Event Page here.

This the opening event for “Winyan Awanyankapi: Protecting the Lifegivers” Conference, but is open to the public. McKeig — the first Native American appointed to the Minnesota Supreme Court — will give a keynote address on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

Indigenous people attend at no cost in recognition of the theft of their lands. Non-indigenous people are asked to make a $50 donation, but no one will be turned away. The event will open with welcoming and ceremony, followed by Justice McKeig’s address.

Ikidowin Native Youth Ensemble performs: “We Do it for the Water”

Saturday, April 6, First Universalist Church, 3400 Dupont Ave. S., Minneapolis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., play starts at 7 p.m. Facebook Event Page here.

This is part of the “Winyan Awanyankapi: Protecting the Lifegivers” Conference, but is open to the public.

The Ikidowin Acting Ensemble is a company of Native teens, 12-16 years old, that will present a play: “We Will Do it for the Water!” The play was written by Sharon Day (Ojibwe) and is based on recent efforts by Indigenous People to protect the waterways. Directed by Curtis Kirby (Ojibwe).

Indigenous people attend at no cost in recognition of the theft of their lands. Non-indigenous people are asked to make a suggested donation of $50 to support the conference, but no one will be turned away.

Documentary: DAWNLAND, Cultural Survival and Stolen Children

Monday, April 8, 5-8 p.m. and Saturday, April 13, 11:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Both screenings will be held at the University of Minnesota-St. Paul campus’ Student Center Theatre, 2017 Buford Ave., St. Paul.

Both events are free and open to the public Appetizers and beverages will be served. Register for tickets here.

According to promotional materials:

For most of the 20th century, government agents systematically forced Native American children from their homes and placed them with white families. As recently as the 1970’s, one in four Native children nationwide were living in non-Native foster care, adoptive homes, or boarding schools. Many children experienced devastating emotional and physical harm by adults who mistreated them and tried to erase their cultural identity.

Now, for the first time, they are being asked to share their stories.

Sandy Whitehawk (Sicangu Lakota) will facilitate a discussion following the film. Sandy played an integral part of the TRC work in Maine and continues to support reconciliation efforts around the country, including Minnesota.

See dawnland.org for more information.

Celebrating Native Voices: Short Films by Indigenous Filmmakers

Enjoy a night of short films that include films ranging from narrative fiction based on historical reality to documentary to youth produced work. The filmmakers will participate in person and via zoom.

The films will be screened from 4-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16, at the University of St. Thomas O’Shaughnessy Educational Center Auditorium, 2115 Summit Ave. in St. Paul. This is part of Augsburg College’s Native American Film Series.

Here’s the list of films:

Firemakers (N’We Jinan, 2018, 4 min) This short music video was recorded with Ojibwe students of Zhingwako Zaiganing School in Lac La Croix First Nation in Ontario, Canada.  Their song and imagery talks to the issues close to their heart and lives.

GO GREEN AND STAY CLEAN (First Person Productions: Melannie Bice (White Earth Ojibwe), 2018) This youth produced video investigates different forms of renewable energy at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus and Edison High School campus. We as the youth want to influence society on new knowledge about renewable energy and the sources used on these campuses of how you could use green energy. Renewable energy is leading to the near future that will soon be accessible for all as a fundamental ongoing initiative.

SOLDIER (Myrton Running Wolf, 2018, 25 minutes) In this half-hour short film, two young Lakota sisters, refugees of the Wounded Knee Massacre, fight to survive against a relentless enemy.  The film is written and directed by Myrton Running Wolf and executive produced by the renowned Academy Award and Golden Globe nominated director Terrence Malick.

Reclaiming Sacred Tobacco (Leya Hale, Dakota & Diné, 2016, 27 minutes ) This documentary depicts Minnesota Native communities reclaiming traditional practices around sacred tobacco and discouraging commercial tobacco use in order to promote a healthier lifestyle. It received award nominations at the American Indian Film Festival (Best Public Service documentary) and Red Nation Film Festival (Best Documentary Short), and was an official selection at Highway 61 Film Festival. It is still currently being screened at small Native Film Festivals around the country.

SÁMI BOJÁ (Elle Sofe Henrikson (Sami), 2015, 15 min) Mikkel is a reindeer herder who has the entire responsibility for the herd of his family. He has a tough shell like a Sami boy should have. But in his inside there is chaos. Screened in collaboration with the Norwegian Film Institute

 

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