State Capitol Art Public Input Meeting; This Day in History: Sand Creek Massacre

Reminder: The state committee reviewing art in the State Capitol is holding a public input meeting Tuesday, Dec. 1, at Hamline University’s Anderson Center from 6-8 p.m., rooms 304-305. The Anderson Center is at the corner of Snelling Ave. N. and Englewood Ave. in St. Paul. Healing Minnesota Stories has a petition outlining our concerns about some of the art in the Capitol. Please consider signing. The state Art Subcommittee website has additional information on the review process. Please attend the Public Input meeting if you can and make your voice heard!

This Day in History: The Sand Creek Massacre

On November 29, 1864,  a 700-man force of the Colorado Territory militia attacked a peaceful village of Cheyenne and Arapaho,  “killing and mutilating an estimated 70–163 Native Americans, about two-thirds of whom were women and children,” according to Wikipedia. It is referred to as the Sand Creek Massacre. John Chivington, a Methodist pastor and a Colonel in the U.S. Volunteers, led the attack. Chivington and his troops took scalps and body parts as trophies. Investigations of the massacre condemned Chivington’s conduct but he never faced criminal charges.

One investigation was done by the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the Wars. The Wikipedia entry provides the following verbatim from its report:

[Chivington] deliberately planned and executed a foul and dastardly massacre which would have disgraced the veriest savage among those who were the victims of his cruelty. Having full knowledge of their friendly character, having himself been instrumental to some extent in placing them in their position of fancied security, he took advantage of their in-apprehension and defenceless condition to gratify the worst passions that ever cursed the heart of man.

Methodists sought to repent of the attack in 2014, on the 150th anniversary of the massacre. That same year, the Governor of Colorado apologized for the massacre.

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